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Health should be the guiding science of humanity, explaining what we are by unravelling the body mechanisms that make us happy, living free from illness.  It may be acceptable to seek scientific knowledge by using electron microscopes for the benefit of the medical industry, as it is the use of radio telescopes to advance astronomy. The enormous expenditure demanded by those endeavours may or may not be justified, but the absence of funding for an authentic health science and the formation of health doctors, is certainly unjustified and shocking. Investment on health could fill a painful gap in the world population, providing health guidance to individuals and institutions. I became aware of this absurdity after a trip from Sydney to Melbourne, where I spent my holidays early in 1984. As I walked along Melbourne’s streets I felt a tingling sensation in my arms and hands. It ceased after a few minutes only to return later in repeated cycles. The following day I was returning to Sydney when the tingling gradually turned into a pain that made it almost unbearable to hold my car’s steering wheel. As soon as got to the suburb of St Marys I went to see a doctor who diagnosed arthritis and prescribed an anti-inflammatory medication, to which he added sleeping pills the following day to allow me some rest during the nights. The pain subsided, but I had to keep on visiting the doctor for a new prescription each time I run out of medication. One day I candidly asked him: How long is this treatment going to last? to which he matter-of-factly replied: For good. I turned around shaken, and walked into the street without saying a word. Scepticism came to the rescue with a strong signal, as medicine suddenly appeared in my sceptic’s radar screen. The only thing I knew with certainty was that I wanted to recover my health, an almost impossible task as I had nowhere to go. Doctors, or so-called general practitioners were easy to find in any built-up area. Health advice, on the other hand, seemed to be the domain of an amorphous range of alternative medicine providers whose academic background seemed varied and uncertain. Once again, they all practiced therapies of one sort or another, but that was not what I was looking for. I wanted advice on how to adopt a way of life that helped to restore my health.  The public library down the street became the lighthouse, a reliable indicator of the direction I was going to follow, if not how distant the place of arrival would be. It was a logically organized place, where the book sections had labels with names that represented health and medicine as what they really are, separated as they should be. My medicated history suddenly came to an end. I read books that made me aware of the so-called diseases of civilization, and arthritis was one of them. I learnt about calories and adopted a diet consisting mainly on vegetables, cereals and fruits, free from processed foods. All of this involved a change of lifestyle that sent both, pains and medicines away at the same time. Little I knew, however, of the changes I would undertake until now, when scientific studies during the last few years have contributed to make the methods to achieve health more coherent and functional. Ariel Gallo is a former translator, dedicated to healthy lifestyles research and practice since 1984.

ABOUT

These pages have been created to promote health for what it is, quite apart from what is related to medical professionals and their varied interventions. I am aware of the tendency to trust writers qualified in medical fields to provide adequate commentaries on this subject. Paradoxically, those writers have never received health training. I have no academic qualifications, which may be an advantage to put forward a proposal for the benefit of everybody without the constraints experienced by those who make a living out of the gigantic medical industry. Health should be the guiding science of humanity, explaining what we are by unravelling the body mechanisms that make us happy, living free from illness.  It may be acceptable to seek scientific knowledge by using electron microscopes for the benefit of the medical industry, as it is the use of radio telescopes to advance astronomy. The enormous expenditure demanded by those endeavours may or may not be justified, but the absence of funding for an authentic health science and the formation of health doctors, is certainly unjustified and shocking. Investment on health could fill a painful gap in the world population, providing health guidance to individuals and institutions. I became aware of this absurdity after a trip from Sydney to Melbourne, where I spent my holidays early in 1984. As I walked along Melbourne’s streets I felt a tingling sensation in my arms and hands. It ceased after a few minutes only to return later in repeated cycles. The following day I was returning to Sydney when the tingling gradually turned into a pain that made it almost unbearable to hold my car’s steering wheel. As soon as got to the suburb of St Marys I went to see a doctor who diagnosed arthritis and prescribed an anti-inflammatory medication, to which he added sleeping pills the following day to allow me some rest during the nights. The pain subsided, but I had to keep on visiting the doctor for a new prescription each time I run out of medication. One day I candidly asked him: How long is this treatment going to last? to which he matter-of-factly replied: For good. I turned around shaken, and walked into the street without saying a word. Scepticism came to the rescue with a strong signal, as medicine suddenly appeared in my sceptic’s radar screen. The only thing I knew with certainty was that I wanted to recover my health, an almost impossible task as I had nowhere to go. Doctors, or so- called general practitioners were easy to find in any built-up area. Health advice, on the other hand, seemed to be the domain of an amorphous range of alternative medicine providers whose academic background seemed varied and uncertain. Once again, they all practiced therapies of one sort or another, but that was not what I was looking for. I wanted advice on how to adopt a way of life that helped to restore my health.  The public library down the street became the lighthouse, a reliable indicator of the direction I was going to follow, if not how distant the place of arrival would be. It was a logically organized place, where the book sections had labels with names that represented health and medicine as what they really are, separated as they should be. My medicated history suddenly came to an end. I read books that made me aware of the so- called diseases of civilization, and arthritis was one of them. I learnt about calories and adopted a diet consisting mainly on vegetables, cereals and fruits, free from processed foods. All of this involved a change of lifestyle that sent both, pains and medicines away at the same time. Little I knew, however, of the changes I would undertake until now, when scientific studies during the last few years have contributed to make the methods to achieve health more coherent and functional. Ariel Gallo is a former translator, dedicated to healthy lifestyles research and practice since 1984.
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ABOUT

These pages have been created to promote health for what it is, quite apart from what is related to medical professionals and their varied interventions. I am aware of the tendency to trust writers qualified in medical fields to provide adequate commentaries on this subject. Paradoxically, those writers have never received health training. I have no academic qualifications, which may be an advantage to put forward a proposal for the benefit of everybody without the constraints experienced by those who make a living out of the gigantic medical industry. Health should be the guiding science of humanity, explaining what we are by unravelling the body mechanisms that make us happy, living free from illness.  It may be acceptable to seek scientific knowledge by using electron microscopes for the benefit of the medical industry, as it is the use of radio telescopes to advance astronomy. The enormous expenditure demanded by those endeavours may or may not be justified, but the absence of funding for an authentic health science and the formation of health doctors, is certainly unjustified and shocking. Investment on health could fill a painful gap in the world population, providing health guidance to individuals and institutions. I became aware of this absurdity after a trip from Sydney to Melbourne, where I spent my holidays early in 1984. As I walked along Melbourne’s streets I felt a tingling sensation in my arms and hands. It ceased after a few minutes only to return later in repeated cycles. The following day I was returning to Sydney when the tingling gradually turned into a pain that made it almost unbearable to hold my car’s steering wheel. As soon as got to the suburb of St Marys I went to see a doctor who diagnosed arthritis and prescribed an anti-inflammatory medication, to which he added sleeping pills the following day to allow me some rest during the nights. The pain subsided, but I had to keep on visiting the doctor for a new prescription each time I run out of medication. One day I candidly asked him: How long is this treatment going to last? to which he matter-of-factly replied: For good. I turned around shaken, and walked into the street without saying a word. Scepticism came to the rescue with a strong signal, as medicine suddenly appeared in my sceptic’s radar screen. The only thing I knew with certainty was that I wanted to recover my health, an almost impossible task as I had nowhere to go. Doctors, or so-called general practitioners were easy to find in any built-up area. Health advice, on the other hand, seemed to be the domain of an amorphous range of alternative medicine providers whose academic background seemed varied and uncertain. Once again, they all practiced therapies of one sort or another, but that was not what I was looking for. I wanted advice on how to adopt a way of life that helped to restore my health.  The public library down the street became the lighthouse, a reliable indicator of the direction I was going to follow, if not how distant the place of arrival would be. It was a logically organized place, where the book sections had labels with names that represented health and medicine as what they really are, separated as they should be. My medicated history suddenly came to an end. I read books that made me aware of the so-called diseases of civilization, and arthritis was one of them. I learnt about calories and adopted a diet consisting mainly on vegetables, cereals and fruits, free from processed foods. All of this involved a change of lifestyle that sent both, pains and medicines away at the same time. Little I knew, however, of the changes I would undertake until now, when scientific studies during the last few years have contributed to make the methods to achieve health more coherent and functional. Ariel Gallo is a former translator, dedicated to healthy lifestyles research and practice since 1984.
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